Ive Just Finished My Homework

'I have been to Boston.'

Have/has + past participle makes the present perfect.

She has losther bag.

They have taken a taxi

I have been to Australia

The present perfect tense is used to describe something that happened in the past, but the exact time it happened is not important. It has a relationship with the present.

I have done my homework = I finished my homework in the past. It is not important at what exact time, only that it is now done.

I have forgotten my bag. = Exactly when in the past that I forgot it is not important. The important thing is that I don't have it now.

As we do not use exact time expressions with the past perfect, we cannot say:
I have done my homework

In this case we use the past simple tense:

I did my homework yesterday.

Using alreadyjust and yet with the present perfect

Already, just and yet can are all used with the present perfect.

Already means 'something has happened sooner than we expected:

'The movie only came out yesterday, but I have already seen it.'

Just means 'a short time ago':

'I have just seen your brother going into the bank with a gun!'

Yet is only used in questions and negative sentences. It means 'something is expected to happen':

'Have you finished the report yet?'
No, I haven't finished it yet.'

Now choose the best answer to make the present perfect:





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"I'm done my homework"

How many of you use this grammatical construction -- "I'm done my homework." It is used by virtually everyone in the Philadelphia region, where I'm from, and I had never thought anything of it until a couple months ago when it was pointed out to me that it's not used here in Pittsburgh, where I attend school. Quite a surprise to me.

It looks like a contraction of "I'm done with my homework" and a mix-up with "I've done my homework".

<<How many of you use this grammatical construction -- "I'm done my homework." It is used by virtually everyone in the Philadelphia region,>>

I've never used it or heard it. "I've finished my homework" is the way I'd say it.

No, I would never say, "I'm done my homework". But I could say:

"I'm done with my homework."
or
"I've done my homework."
or
"I've finished my homework."

Have you finished? yes, I´m done. It´s means that you have finished what you were doing.

If I'm not wrong, "Present Perfect" and "Past Tense" express the same meaning in American English. So you could also say:


I did my homework.

or

I finished my homework.

It's not gramatically correct to say "I'm done my homework", I'd say:

-I'm done WITH my homework
-I'VE done my homework
- I DID my homework

<<"Present Perfect" and "Past Tense" express the same meaning in American English>>

So that means that there's no difference between:

1) They've been here for two weeks

-and-

2) They were here for two weeks

in the US?

Yes, I know about the other ways of expressing this phrase (the grammatically correct ways). They sound verbose and unnecessary to me because I grew up using the "I'm done my..." construction as did my friends and everyone else in my community.

>>So that means that there's no difference between:

1) They've been here for two weeks

-and-

2) They were here for two weeks

in the US? <<

I doubt it. I'm sure they would interpret it as...

1) They've been here for two weeks = Up to this point in time, two weeks have passed and they are still here.

2) They were here for two weeks = At some point in the past, they had stayed here for a duration of two weeks.

The verbal construction "I'm done" is as old as beans. Despite much pedantry from the experts, "I'm done my homework" is fine, though it may well be regional in nature as an expression.

My hunch is the same as Guest's who wrote "It looks like a contraction of "I'm done with my homework" and a mix-up with "I've done my homework".

It is hard to tell however if this is an example of imperfectly learned English in a ghetto environment or whether it was largely artificially perpetrated by a few people trying to be humorous.

To Guest,


Please tell me if there is any difference between these two sentences.

Just imagine, I am right now in my friend's house and have had this below conversation a while ago.


B1: Where have you been, B2?
B2: I have been to NewYork.


B1: Where were you, B2?
B2: I was in NewYork.



Thanks.

Yes.

The first conversation uses the present perfect, and the second uses the simple past. In the first conversation, the notion that you have been to New York recently is implied, whereas in the second conversation it is impossible to tell when you went to New York.

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